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6.7 Power Stroke V-8

The 6.7L Power Stroke is the first diesel engine designed, developed, and manufactured in-house by Ford Motor Company for pickup and chassis cab truck applications. Introduced to the Ford Super Duty platform (F-250, F-350, F-450, F-550) for the 2011 model year, it replaced the short-lived 6.4L Power Stroke produced by International-Navistar and marked the end of a decades long relationship between the two companies. Ford's strategic decision to dissolve its relationship with International-Navistar, whom had supplied Ford Motor Company with diesel engines for the pickup truck segment since 1983, was based on a number of factors that included at least one large scale lawsuit over warranty claim responsibilities.

The 6.7L Power Stroke was internally codenamed "Scorpion" through its developmental stages. The nickname was derived from the unique shape and structure of the turbocharger arrangement, which feeds exhaust gases to the centrally mounted turbocharger from the top of the engine valley while the intake ports are located on the lower sides of the cylinder heads where, traditionally, the exhaust manifolds would be found.

6.7 Power Stroke Engine Features

Engine Architecture

The 6.7L Power Stroke diesel is a standard 90 degree V-8 engine with a compacted graphite iron (CGI) engine block and aluminum cylinder heads. Its exhaust and intake manifold design is unique in that the flows are reversed; the intake ports are located on the outer deck of the cylinder head (closest to the fender wells) and the exhaust ports exit directly into the engine valley where the turbocharger is mounted. This design increases thermal efficiency by providing a shortened, direct path to the turbocharger turbine where the total heat dissipated is reduced and exhaust gas energy is conserved.

Fuel System

The 6.7L Power Stroke diesel employs a high pressure common rail fuel injection system. A Bosch CP4 injection pump produces up to 36,000 psi of injection pressure through Piezoelectric fuel injectors. The injection pump is fed by an electric lift pump that provides up to three times the required fuel flowrate to provide critical lubrication and cooling to the injection pump; unused diesel fuel is returned to the fuel tank in a continuous loop.

Two fuel filtration units are employed to ensure fuel is clean and free of water before entering the injection pump. The primary fuel filter captures particles down to 10 microns and is located in the diesel fuel conditioning module (DFCM), which also contains the fuel-water separator and is either frame mounted or mounted near the fuel tank (exact position depends on chassis and fuel tank type). The secondary fuel filter is mounted beneath the hood near the firewall on the driver side; it filters particles down to 4 microns. On 2011 to 2019 model year trucks, the fuel lift pump (low pressure fuel pump) is incorporated into the DFCM. On later model year vehicles, the fuel lift pump is located in the fuel tank.

All model year 6.7L Power Stroke diesels are certified to run on biodiesel blends up to B20 (20% biodiesel, renewable, or biomass diesel and 80% conventional petroleum diesel fuel). Operating the engine repeatedly on more concentrated biodiesel blends or pure biodiesel is not advised as fuel system damage may occur. Additionally, it is noteworthy that biodiesel and biodiesel blends degrade more rapidly that petroleum diesel and thus such fuels should not be stored in fuel tanks for extended periods of time (Ford suggests flushing biodiesel out fuel lines by filling and running vehicle with regular diesel if vehicle is to be stored for more than 1 month).

Turbocharger System

Although several different turbocharger configurations (and models) have been employed in the 6.7L Power Stroke engine platform, they all feature an air-to-water charge air cooler (intercooler) and some form of variable geometry turbocharger. The first generation 6.7 diesels (2011 - 2014) featured a unique single sequential "DualBoost" turbocharger. The single sequential design uses a pair of separately sized compressors mounted to a common shaft with a single turbine, allowing for performance characteristics similar to a twin turbo system but in the packaging of a single unit. Later engine generations would receive more traditional Garrett variable geometry turbochargers, likely due to the sequential turbos added expense and inferior reliability.

DualBoost SST turbocharger cutaway view

DualBoost single sequential turbocharger; note the dual compressors and compressor housing inlets
Image courtesy Ford Motor Company

An air-to-water intercooler utilizes engine coolant in the secondary cooling system circuit (see cooling system subsection below) to remove heat from the intake air charge in lieu of the traditional air-to-air intercooler systems found on previous Power Stroke engine models. In terms of heat transfer, water is a significantly more effective working fluid than air and thus the 6.7L Power Stroke's air-to-water charge air cooler is more efficient in removing heat from the air charge and reducing intake air temperatures.

Cooling System

The 6.7L Power Stroke diesel utilizes two separate cooling systems, each with its own radiator, degas bottle, thermostats, and belt driven water pump. The primary (high temperature) cooling system radiator is mounted behind (closer to the engine) the secondary (low temperature) cooling system radiator as the secondary system operates at a significantly lower temperature than the primary and is thus given priority to airflow through the grille.

2011 - 2014 Model Year Cooling System Overview

The primary cooling system provides engine coolant to the engine block, cylinder heads, engine oil cooler, turbocharger, first half of the EGR cooler, and the heater core. A dual thermostat assembly with two separate thermostatic mechanisms that operate at different opening temperatures controls coolant flow through the primary cooling system. The first thermostatic mechanism opens at 194° F (90° C) while maximum coolant flow is achieved when the second mechanism opens at 201° F (94° C). Figure 1 below describes coolant flow in the primary cooling system circuit.

6.7L Power Stroke primary cooling system (high temperature) coolant flow diagram

Figure 1 - coolant flow diagram, primary cooling system circuit for 2011 to 2014 model year engines
Image courtesy Ford Motor Company

The secondary cooling system provides coolant to the charge-air-cooler, fuel cooler, second half of the EGR cooler, and transmission oil cooler. The secondary radiator has two outlets, one on each side of the radiator, each controlled by a thermostat. The passenger side outlet is controlled by a 140° F thermostat and provides coolant to the EGR cooler and transmission oil cooler. Coolant that exits this outlet only circulates through the top half of the radiator. The driver side outlet, positioned closer to the bottom of the radiator, is controlled by a 113° F thermostat and provides coolant to the charge-air-cooler and diesel fuel cooler. Coolant that exits this outlet circulates through the top and bottom halves of the radiator and is this moderately lower in temperature than that exiting the passenger side outlet (the charge-air-cooler and fuel cooler require lower coolant temperatures than the EGR and transmission oil coolers). Figure 2 below describes coolant flow in the secondary cooling system circuit.

6.7L Power Stroke secondary cooling system (low temperature) coolant flow diagram

Figure 2 - coolant flow diagram, secondary cooling system circuit for 2011 to 2014 model year engines
Image courtesy Ford Motor Company

2015 - 2023 Model year Cooling System Overview

For the 2015 model year, the cooling system was modified so that both EGR coolant circuits were fed by the primary cooling system, reducing heat loads on the secondary cooling system and eliminating the dual thermostat radiator design. The 2020 6.7L Power Stroke update revised the cooling system yet again, this time removing the transmission cooler from the secondary cooling system and feeding it through the primary cooling system circuit. On 2020 and newer model year engines, the secondary cooling system only provides engine coolant to the air-to-water charge air cooler and the diesel fuel cooler.

Emissions System

The 6.7L Power Stroke diesel features a series of sophisticated emissions control systems, including advanced exhaust aftertreatment solutions. It is the first engine in the Power Stroke diesel family to require a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NOx emissions and meet emissions regulations at both the Federal and State levels. Figure 3 below outlines the arrangement of each component in the exhaust aftertreatment system.

6.7L Power Stroke exhaust aftertreatment system arrangement (DOC, SCR, DPF placement)

Figure 3 - 6.7L Power Stroke exhaust aftertreatment system component arrangement
Image courtesy Ford Motor Company

Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR)

Exhaust gas recirculation is the first step in reducing emissions of nitrous oxides (NOx). By cooling and reintroducing a metered amount of exhaust gases into the intake air charge, combustion temperatures are reduced and NOx emissions are decreased substantially. The EGR cooler is mounted above the passenger side valve cover and features a two stage cooling circuit. While early engines (2011 - 2014) relied on the primary cooling system for the first stage of cooling and the second stage on the secondary cooling system, all 2015 and newer model year engines cool both stages with the primary cooling system. A throttle body mounted to the mouth of the lower intake manifold is employed to promote EGR exhaust flow by creating a differential pressure between the intake and EGR systems.

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC)

The exhaust aftertreatment system starts with the DOC, which is mounted closest to the engine. As exhaust gases flow through the DOC, an oxidation reaction converts select hydrocarbons into carbon dioxide and water vapor. The DOC is also critical to creating and maintaining heat in the exhaust system since the oxidation reaction is exothermic and thus generates heat as it occurs.

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR)

The selective catalytic reduction system combats NOx emissions using a specially formulated exhaust fluid. Diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) is a solution comprised of approximately 67.5% distilled water and 32.5% dissolved urea, its active ingredient. DEF is introduced into the exhaust aftertreatment system through a dosing nozzle mounted before the entrance of the SCR catalyst unit. A spiral shaped auger allows DEF to thoroughly mix with exhaust gases and thermally degrade into ammonia and carbon dioxide prior to entering the catalyst. Inside the SCR catalyst, NOx gases and ammonia and converted into harmless nitrogen gas and water vapor through a reduction reaction.

Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF)

The diesel particulate filter is mounted behind the SCR unit on pickup truck models, but in front of the SCR system on all chassis cab trucks. Particulate matter (primarily soot) suspended in the exhaust stream is captured in the DPF's silicon carbide substrate and stored for removal via incineration. The DPF is cleaned via a method called regeneration, for which there are two types. Passive regeneration occurs anytime the exhaust gas temperature rises above 572° F, the minimum temperature required for particulate matter in the DPF to begin breaking down into smaller hydrocarbons that can pass through the filter. This process is entirely transparent to the driver and occurs "naturally", however it is not particularly effective at cleaning the filter rapidly.

Active regeneration is required periodically to clean the diesel particulate filter. Active regeneration is initiated when the pressure in the exhaust system reaches a predetermined threshold. During active regeneration, raw fuel is introduced into the exhaust stream to generate temperatures in excess of 1,000° F and burn off particulate matter in the DPF while the vehicle is driving. The miles driven before active regeneration is completed varies widely and depends on driving conditions; 10 to 20 miles of driving is not uncommon. Active regeneration is temporarily paused if vehicle speed falls below 35 mph and driving above 35 mph is required for active regeneration to occur. Highway speeds (55+ mph) are ideal to expedite the regeneration process.

6.7 Power Stroke Specs

Engine:

6.7L Power Stroke diesel, 6.7L Power Stroke High Output diesel

Manufacturer:

Ford Motor Company

Type:

4 stroke diesel

Configuration:

90 degree V-8

Applications:

2011 - present Ford F-250, F-350, F-450 Super Duty pickup trucks
2011 - present Ford F-250, F-350, F-450, F-550 chassis cab trucks
2015 - present Ford F-650, F-750 medium duty trucks
2021 - present Ford F-600 chassis cab trucks

B10 Life:

500,000 miles (800,000 km)

B50 Life:

Not specified

Displacement:

6.65 liters (6.7 liters nominal), 405.63 CID (406 CID nominal)

Bore:

3.897 inches (99.0 mm)

Stroke:

4.251 inches (108.0 mm)

Bore/Stroke Ratio:

0.92 (undersquare)

Compression Ratio:

2011 - 2019 models

16.2:1

2020 - present models

15.8:1

Firing Order:

1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8

6.7L Power Stroke firing order and cylinder numbers (locations)
Note the 6.7L Power Stroke uses an alternative cylinder numbering convention than previous Power Stroke diesel engines

Engine Block Material:

Compacted graphite iron (CGI)

Cylinder Head Material:

Aluminum alloy

Injection System:

Direct injection, high pressure common rail
• 30,000 psi max injection pressure for 2011 - 2019 model year engines
• 36,000 psi max injection pressure for 2020+ model year engines
• 19 mm piezo electric fuel injectors with 8 hole nozzles
• Bosch CP4.2 high pressure fuel injection pump

Aspiration:

Turbocharged, intercooled, air-to-water charge air cooler (CAC)

Turbocharger:

2011 - 2014 pickup truck

Garrett SST3266V DualBoost single sequential turbocharger (SST) with vacuum operated wastegate, water cooled

2015 - 2016 pickup truck

Garrett GT3788V variable geometry turbocharger (VGT), water cooled

Note - 2015 to 2019 turbochargers are of the same model, but with different oil supply line and turbo pedestal; 2015-2016 turbos not directly cross-compatible with 2017-2019 turbos

2017 - 2019 pickup truck

2020+ pickup truck

Ford part number LC3Z-6K682-A variable geometry turbocharger (VGT), water cooled

2023 high output models

TBD

2011 - 2016 chassis cab

Garrett AVNT3276V variable geometry turbocharger (VGT), water cooled

2015+ F-650, F-750

Garrett GT3582V variable geometry turbocharger (VGT), water cooled

2017 - 2019 chassis cab

Garrett GT3582V variable geometry turbocharger (VGT), water cooled

2020+ chassis cab

Ford part number LC4Z-6K682-A variable geometry turbocharger (VGT), water cooled

Reciprocating Assembly:

• Ford steel crankshaft with shrink fit camshaft drive gear
• Fractured cap connecting rods
• Oil cooled pistons; internal passage integrated into the bottom of each piston allows oil to flow through and cool the top of the piston
• Aluminum pistons on 2011 - 2019 model year engines, short skirt steel pistons on 2020+ model year engines

Valvetrain:

Overhead valve, conventional pushrod cam-in-block
• 4 valves per cylinder; 2 exhaust valves, 2 intake valves (32 valve)
• Gear driven camshaft
• Stamped steel rocker arms
• Patented roller camshaft followers with hydraulic valve lash adjusters

Cooling System:

Dual cooling system with mechanical thermostat assembly; primary cooling system operates at high temperatures, secondary cooling system operates at significantly lower temperatures.

Cold Start Aid(s):

Ceramic glow plugs, 1 per cylinder

Oil Pump Type:

Gerotor type oil pump mounted in front engine cover

Engine Oil Capacity:

13.0 U.S. quarts with filter change

Engine Oil Spec:

10W-30 engine oil preferred for normal use
5W-40 or 15W-40 engine oil is recommended for severe duty conditions
Viscosity selection will depend on ambient temperature
Engine oil must meet API CJ-4 or CJ-4/sm standards
Synthetic engine oil recommended; see 6.7L Power Stroke engine oil viscosity chart for additional details

Lube Oil Filter Part Number:

Ford/Motorcraft FL-2051S

Fuel:

Ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD), maximum B20 biodiesel blends

Fuel Filter Part Number:

2011 - 2016 model years

Ford/Motorcraft FD-4615 (set, primary & secondary fuel filter)

2017 - 2022 model years

Ford/Motorcraft FD-4625-AA (set, primary & secondary fuel filter)

Peak Rated Power:

300 - 500 horsepower (see full model and model year breakdown in section below)

Peak Rated Torque:

660 - 1,200 lb-ft (see full model and model year breakdown in section below)

Idle Speed:

625 - 650 rpm on average; idle speed may vary based on conditions that include engine temperature, regeneration status, and electrical system demands

Emissions Equipment:

• Cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR); two stages of cooling before gases are recirculated, EGR metering valve positioned at inlet of EGR cooler
• Diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC)
• Selective catalytic reduction (SCR), requires diesel exhaust fluid (DEF)
• Diesel particulate filter (DPF); silicon carbide substrate

Coupled Transmissions:

2011 - 2019 pickup/chassis cab

TorqShift 6R140 six speed automatic

2020+ pickup/chassis cab

TorqShift 10R140 ten speed automatic

2015 F-650, F-750

TorqShift 6R140 six speed automatic

Engine Weight:

Approximately 1,100 lbs wet, 990 lbs dry

Engine Dimensions:

Length:

44.4 inches (112.7 cm)

Width:

33.3 inches (84.6 cm)

Height:

33.7 inches (85.6 cm)

6.7 Power Stroke Turbocharger Models & Types

Application(s)

Type

Turbo Model

Features

2011 - 2014 pickup

"DualBoost" Single sequential (SST)

Garrett SST3266V

• Twin compressor, single turbine design (compressor wheels mounted to a single common shaft)
• Variable geometry turbine housing (variable nozzle, variable vane)
• Hydraulic VGT actuator
• Vacuum operated wastegate (PCM controlled via vacuum solenoid)
• Water cooled via primary cooling system
• Ceramic ball bearing design

2015 - 2019 pickup

Single variable geometry

Garrett GT3788V

• Variable geometry turbine housing (variable nozzle, variable vane)
• Hydraulic VGT actuator
• Non-wastegated
• Water cooled via primary cooling system
• 2015 to 2019 turbochargers are of the same model, but with different oil supply line and turbo pedestal; 2015-2016 turbos not directly cross-compatible with 2017-2019 turbos

2020 - 2023 pickup

Single variable geometry

Ford LC3Z-6K682-A

• Variable geometry turbine housing (variable nozzle, variable vane)
• Electronically actuated VGT position
• Ball bearing design
• Water cooled via primary cooling system

2023 high output

TBD

TBD

TBD

2011 - 2016 chassis cab

Single variable geometry

Garrett AVNT3276V

• Variable geometry turbine housing (variable nozzle, variable vane)
• Hydraulic VGT actuator
• Non-wastegated
• Water cooled via primary cooling system

2015 - 2023 F-650, F-750

Single variable geometry

Garrett GT3582V

• Variable geometry turbine housing (variable nozzle, variable vane)
• Hydraulic VGT actuator
• Non-wastegated
• Water cooled via primary cooling system
• Ball bearing design

2017 - 2019 chassis cab

Single variable geometry

Garrett GT3582V

• Variable geometry turbine housing (variable nozzle, variable vane)
• Hydraulic VGT actuator
• Non-wastegated
• Water cooled via primary cooling system
• Ball bearing design

2020 - 2023 chassis cab

Single variable geometry

Ford LC4Z-6K682-A

• Variable geometry turbine housing (variable nozzle, variable vane)
• Electronically actuated VGT position
• Ball bearing design
• Water cooled via primary cooling system

Horsepower & Torque Ratings by Application

Ford Super Duty Pickup Trucks

Model Year(s)

Rated Horsepower

Rated Torque

2011[1]

390 hp @ 2,800 rpm

735 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2011 - 2014 [1]

400 hp @ 2,800 rpm

800 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2015 - 2016

440 hp @ 2,800 rpm

860 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2017

440 hp @ 2,800 rpm

925 lb-ft @ 1,800 rpm

2018 - 2019

450 hp @ 2,800 rpm

935 lb-ft @ 1,800 rpm

2020 - 2023

475 hp @ 2,800 rpm

1,050 lb-ft @ 1,800 rpm

2023 High Output [2]

500 hp

1,200 lb-ft

[1] - Ford Motor Company issued a free dealer PCM reflash for early engines that increased horsepower and torque to the 2012 figures.
[2] - Details on high output engine released October 27th, 2023.

Ford Super Duty Chassis Cabs & Medium Duty Trucks (Commercial Vehicles)

Model Year(s)

Rated Horsepower

Rated Torque

2011 - 2016 Super Duty

300 hp @ 2,800 rpm

660 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2015 - 2023 F-650, F-750 [1]

270 hp @ 2,400 rpm
300 hp @ 2,600 rpm
330 hp @ 2,600 rpm

675 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm
700 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm
725 lb-ft @ 1,800 rpm

2017 Super Duty

330 hp @ 2,800 rpm

750 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2018 - 2019 Super Duty

330 hp @ 2,600 rpm

750 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

2020 - 2022 Super Duty

330 hp @ 2,600 rpm

825 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm

[1] - F-650 and F-750 medium duty trucks available in one of three output ratings ranging from 270 to 330 horsepower.

6.7 Power Stroke Horsepower & Torque Curves

2011 model year 6.7L Power Stroke horsepower and torque curves

2011(introductory) 6.7L Power Stroke horsepower and torque curves, Super Duty pickup trucks
Image courtesy Ford Motor Company

2012 to 2014 model year 6.7L Power Stroke horsepower and torque curves

2012 - 2014 6.7L Power Stroke horsepower and torque curves, Super Duty pickup trucks
Includes 2011 model year engines that received the free dealer upgrade
Image courtesy Ford Motor Company

2015 to 2016 model year 6.7L Power Stroke horsepower and torque curves

2015 - 2016 6.7L Power Stroke horsepower and torque curves, Super Duty pickup trucks
Image courtesy Ford Motor Company

2011 to 2016 model year 6.7L Power Stroke chassis cab horsepower and torque curves

2011 - 2016 6.7L Power Stroke horsepower and torque curves, chassis cab trucks only
Image courtesy Ford Motor Company

6.7 Power Stroke Model Year Changes

2011 Power Increase

The 6.7L Power Stroke diesel was originally launched at ratings of 390 horsepower and 735 lb-ft of torque. On August 3rd, 2010 Ford Motor Company announced that horsepower and torque ratings for the 6.7L Power Stroke diesel had been raised to 400 horsepower and 800 lb-ft of torque. Owners of the 390 horsepower model engines were able to receive a free PCM calibration upgrade to the new power figures. These actions were Ford's response to General Motor's announcement of performance figures for the next generation 6.6L Duramax LML, (397 hp, 765 lb-ft of torque); the Power Stroke's performance bump maintained Ford's position as the segment leader in power and torque ratings, while making a positive impression on new Power Stroke diesel owners.

2012 - 2014 Model Year Engine Changes & Updates

• Crankcase ventilation sensor added; identifies whether or not the crankcase ventilation hose is connected, PCM will set DTC if hose is sought to be disconnected (2013 model year update).

• DPF differential pressure sensor added to exhaust system to measure the pressure differential across the diesel particulate filter for the purpose of monitoring DPF condition (2012 model year update).

• Composite engine oil pan and plastic quarter turn oil pan drain valve replaced with a stamped steel oil pan and conventional threaded drain plug (2012 model year update).

• Revised oil cooler secures without any hidden hardware; to remove original oil cooler, the lower oil pan needed to be removed in order to access a hidden stud securing the oil cooler assembly from the back side. Revised oil cooler is secured with exterior bolts only and is serviceable without removing the lower oil pan (2012 model year update).

• An additional NOx sensor and NOx sensor module added to the exhaust system in order to perpetually monitor the effectiveness of the SCR system. The new arrangement adds an NOx sensor before the inlet of the SCR catalyst, previous system only had a NOx sensor at the outlet of the catalyst (2013 model year update).

2015 Model Year Engine Changes & Updates

• Peak engine power increased from 400 to 440 horsepower for all Super duty pickup trucks (40 horsepower increase).

• Peak engine torque increased from 800 to 860 lb-ft for all Super Duty pickup trucks (60 lb-ft increase).

• 6.7L Power Stroke diesel added to Ford F-650 and F-750 medium duty trucks; available in 270, 300, and 330 horsepower configurations.

• Coolant flow through the EGR cooler re-routed such that both stages of cooling are managed by the primary (high temperature) cooling system circuit. The previous arrangement relied on the primary cooling system for the first stage of cooling and the secondary (low temperature) cooling system for the second stage of EGR cooling.

• Revised fan clutch design adds additional heat sinks and is a more robust design to manage more demanding cooling needs of the more powerful 6.7L Power Stroke.

• Revised crankshaft damper design with added mass; necessary due to the increased torsional forces produced by the more powerful engine.

• Updated fuel pressure and temperature sensor that measures actual fuel pressure. The previous sensor acted like a switch (no measurements, only "on" and "off" states) that identified to the PCM whether there was pressure or not, but did not give the PCM an actual fuel pressure reading.

• DualBoost single sequential turbocharger retired and replaced by a larger Garrett variable geometry turbocharger without a wastegate.

• New lower intake manifold, revised to accommodate the new VGT turbocharger with a single air inlet.

• New downpipe inlet design to accommodate the new VGT turbocharger with larger outlet size (pickup trucks only, chassis cab retains a smaller VGT).

• Turbocharger coolant return and engine oil supply line fittings changed from quick connect style to bolt-on flange type for improved sealing and increased reliability; previous quick connect fittings more prone to developing leaks.

• Revised lower main bearings with IROX polymer coating.

• DPF differential pressure sensor removed (previously introduced as a 2012 model year update).

• Particulate matter sensor and module added to exhaust aftertreatment system. The PM sensor monitors and reports particulate matter density in the exhaust stream to identify probable problems with the diesel particulate filter.

• Temperature sensor added to the inlet of the EGR cooler (pickup trucks only).

2020 Engine Changes & Updates

• Peak engine power increased from 450 to 475 horsepower for all Super Duty pickup trucks (25 horsepower increase).

• Peak engine torque increased from 935 to 1,050 lb-ft for all Super Duty pickup trucks (115 lb-ft increase).

• Peak engine torque increased from 750 to 825 lb-ft for all Super Duty chassis cab trucks (75 lb-ft increase).

• Fuel system refinements with increased maximum fuel injection pressure (36,000 psi).

• Strengthened engine block casting, enhanced block structure.

• Strengthened cylinder head casting, revised cylinder head design.

• New forged steel pistons, short skirt design (previously aluminum pistons); compression ratio lowered from 16.2 to 15.8 to 1.

• Revised split stream piston cooling jets.

• Strengthened connecting rod design; powdered metal, fractured cap connecting rods, lengthened to accommodate shorter pistons.

• New medium carbon alloy steel crankshaft with revised damper.

• Improved main bearing and connecting rod bearing designs.

• New composite two piece lower intake manifold design.

• Fuel lift pump moved from the externally mounted diesel fuel conditioning module (DFCM) to inside the fuel tank.

• 10R140 10 speed automatic transmission becomes standard on all pickup and chassis cab trucks; 6R140 remains standard on all medium duty F-650 and F-750 models.

• Transmission cooler moved, mounted to lower front section of the 10R140 transmission.

2023 High Output 6.7 Power Stroke Diesel

Ford Motor Company officially opened orders for the 2023 Ford Super Duty on October 27th, 2023, revealing that the new High Output 6.7L Power Stroke produced a peak 500 horsepower and 1,200 lb-ft of torque. The standard 6.7L Power Stroke, a carryover from the 2022 model year, remains rated at a peak 475 horsepower and 1,050 lb-ft of torque. The High Output variant is available in the F-250, F-350, and F-450 Super Duty in both single rear wheel and dual rear wheel configurations. Its massive torque numbers far surpass any competitor within the pickup truck segment.

Summary & Key Points

• The 6.7L Power Stroke diesel was introduced to the Ford Super Duty pickup and chassis cab truck platforms for the 2011 model year and remains available today.

• 6.7L Power Stroke diesel engines feature a common rail fuel injection system, water cooled charge-air-cooler, and sophisticated exhaust aftertreatment system.

• A high output version of the 6.7L Power Stroke was introduced for the 2023 model year. It's rated at an impressive peak 500 horsepower and 1,200 lb-ft of torque.

• Like most long-lived engine platforms, the 6.7L Power Stroke has undergone many significant changes and improvements since its inception.

• The 6.7L Power Stroke is the first diesel engine designed and developed by Ford Motor Company for use in pickup truck applications; International-Navistar had previously supplied all the engines carrying Ford's "Power Stroke" namesake.